Yes, You Can Have Incredible Fresh Seafood in the Desert, On The Strip

Yes, You Can Have Incredible Fresh Seafood in the Desert

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Just opened: Estiatorio Milos at The Venetian

By Rob Kachelriess | @rkachelriess

The Deets

WHAT: Estiatorio Milos 

IT’S: A fine-dining restaurant based on Mediterreanean cuisine and exceptionally fresh seafood.

OPENED: March 15, 2021

WHO’S BEHIND IT:  Founder Costas Spiliadis, Chef Jesse Maldonado, General Manager Fabian Forlini and Wine Director George Spiliadis.

FUN FACT: Despite his Greek heritage, Costas Spiliadis actually opened the first Milos in Montreal in 1979. He’s since expanded the concept to Athens, Miami, London and two locations in New York as well as Las Vegas.

LOCATION: The Venetian (3355 South Las Vegas Boulevard)

HOURS: Sunday to Thursday | 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday & Saturday | 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. (Lunch daily | 12 p.m. to 3 p.m.)

WEBSITE:  Browse the menu, even if it’s not quite the same as browsing the restaurant’s seafood display 

INSTAGRAM: Take a virtual tour of Milos locations throughout the world.

Photo Credit: Tim Atkins
Photo Courtesy of Rob Kachelriess
Photo Courtesy of Rob Kachelriess

Why We Love It

The arrival of Estiatorio Milos is a vast improvement on the old Aqua Knox space at The Venetian. While the restaurant doesn’t have the outdoor patio and Strip views of its old location at The Cosmopolitan, it’s just as good, if not better in every other way. Greek and Mediterranean ingredients and recipes remain the heart of the menu with the day’s catch displayed on ice in view of the dining room.

To further show off the quality of its ingredients, the restaurant has added a “market stand” of fresh produce, including tomatoes, artichokes and peppers as well as a specialized room to strain Greek yogurt in house. 

Photo Courtesy of Rob Kachelriess

Five Things You Gotta Try

No meal is complete without biting into the catch of the day, which was probably swimming in the waters of the Mediterranean a day earlier. Fish is also sourced from Hawaii, the Atlantic and other parts of the world. Guests are welcome to browse the market display of seafood on ice before ordering. The fish is often charcoal—grilled with lemon, capers and olive oil—or baked whole in sea salt for the table to share.


Fish can also be prepared as sashimi by the raw bar near the front entrance. Ask for the chef’s selection, which may include big eye tuna or Faroe Islands wild-caught salmon. A small piece of feta cheese atop the loup de mer adds a Greek touch without overpowering the fish. 

Photo Credit Tim Atkins

Begin any meal with the Milos Special, a longtime favorite. Thin slices of zucchini and eggplant are dusted with batter, lightly fried and served with Kefalograviera cheese and tzatziki.

Photo Credit: Tim Atkins

The Maryland crab cake also benefits from a delicate presentation. The tender meat crumbles with the touch of a fork, enhanced modestly with mustard aioli and piazzi beans, allowing the natural flavor of the crab to come through.

Courtesy of Rob Kachelriess

For dessert, keep things simple with yogurt, imported from a small-batch producer in Greece and strained in-house with a cheesecloth for a creamy thickness. It arrives at the table topped with thyme honey, sourced from Kythira (a Mediterranean island with less than 80 inhabitants).

Photo Credit: Tim Atkins

Great! What About the Drinks?

Skip the signature cocktails in favor of classics like a Sazerac (with Old Overholt Rye) or Breakfast Martini (with Rosemary Macerated Gin balanced with orange marmalade). However, pairing wines with select dishes could be the most rewarding experience. Ask about the Cava Spiliadis collection of imported Greek wines.


A Little More About the Atmosphere

Estiatorios Milos has a bright, engaging dining room that borrows elements from the previous incarnation at The Cosmopolitan, but with welcome additions. The stone, wood and marble decor is complemented by the energy of an open kitchen and a circular cocktail bar that envelopes the enclosed raw bar. The whole fish on display make for instant selfie stations.

Courtesy of the Rob Kachelriess

The Cost

Estiatorio Milos avoids printing prices on menus for fresh seafood, due to market fluctuations. However, raw bar items range from $4.50 (per oyster) to $85, appetizers run $19 to $34, salads and grilled vegetables are $16 to $32, main courses “from the land” are $59 to $165 and sides are $12 to $15. Wines by the glass are $15 to $28. The best deal? Take advantage of a three-course lunch special for $36 with a pairing of two wines for $18.

The Gist

You couldn’t pick a better place for fresh seafood in Las Vegas. Estiatorio Milos knows not to mess with a good thing and by keeping Jesse Maldonado in charge of the day-to-day kitchen operations, the restaurant continues to source the best seafood in the world on a daily basis and prepare it with welcome restraint to elevate the natural flavors. Most of the dishes on the menu will look familiar, but the addition of the raw bar and yogurt program only enhance the overall experience. 

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